01 October 2010

Well, I did

by Frank Turk

Most of you have read it already, but Dr. Al Mohler exposes the dirty secret about allegedly-conservative values especially as it relates to divorce.



I don't wanna say I told you so, but I did in fact tell you so, almost 2 years ago.

Have a nice weekend. I am sure Dan and Phil will be back with bells on next week. Be in God's house with God's people on His day this weekend, and remember that God is the one who designed marriage -- so treat it like it is His gift.







24 comments:

witness said...

I went back and reread that post... everyone else should.

witness said...

Frank's and Dr. Mohler's.

Al said...

Frank... your inital typo made me think of "All Creatures Great and Small." Just saying :-)

al sends

J♥Yce said...

Thanks for not shortchanging us on what needs to be said concerning marriage/divorce, Frank ~ almost 2 years ago, today, and as God's truth will still matter tomorrow.

Rachael Starke said...

It's nice to see that the esteemed (truly) Dr. Mohler has finally caught up with you on the significance of the secondary problem,

but it's interesting/frustrating/disappointing how few words he dedicates to the reason for that problem. Or, more importantly, the solution to that problem.

Unlike your piece, which, to echo others, is a masterpiece and should be mandatory reading for anyone married, single or inbetween.

Frank Turk said...

I attribute any omission by Dr. Mohler to the vast ocean of information he is culling out to make a simple blog-length post. Imagine trying to catch all th Shrimp in the Gulf of Mexico in one net -- a few large ones are bound to get away.

donsands said...

"Be in God's house with God's people on His day"

I thought of when I hated church. It was somewhere I never wanted to be.

But ever since Christ saved me, and changed my heart, I love church. I love to worship our Father in Spirit and truth. I love to sing hymns and spiritual songs to our Lord.
I love to hear my pastor pray, and pray with him.

Most of all I love to hear the Word taught, and proclaimed with humility and authority.

Lord bless us all this Sunday as we assemble to honor and worship Him.

David Regier said...

Rereading your post reminded me of necessity of connecting everything we are - and everything we advocate - to the narrative of God's word.

Moralism is easily punctured when it's supported outside the plot lines.

stratagem said...

I read both your old post and Dr. Mohler's post. Excellent.
I guess the take-away for me is that evangelicals probably don't have much energy about opposing divorce, because many of them are divorced - and it's a lot easier to oppose sins that you may not have in your background (abortion, homosexuality) than to oppose ones that you do.
Can you imagine how uncomfortable the average church gathering would be if the pastor delivered a sermon on the actual, Biblical view of divorce (and remarriage)? In 30 years as a Christian I'm not sure I've ever heard such a sermon.

Stefan said...

Despite its horrible consequences, divorce seems so easy doesn't it? Easier than trying to work things through.

I thank God that just when our marriage was at its worst, He saved me—and in a church that does that a strong stand on divorce.

As a result, after three years of struggle and in spite of numerous challenges, God has blessed and transformed our marriage, and made us truly one.

Stefan said...

...does take a strong stand on divorce.

Stefan said...

...and more to the point, takes a strong, positive stand on the sanctity marriage.

bp said...

Great post, Frank!

David Regier - Moralism is easily punctured when it's supported outside the plot lines.

So true. Reminds me of the movie Time Changers. Bad acting, but good message (for the most part). We cannot separate good morals from the One who gave them to us to obey.

Clark said...

Mawwiage is wot bwings us together today. That Bwessed awangement, that dweam wifin a dweam.

Robert said...

I have a feeling that more churches need more sermons on sin and how to handle it in their lives. This would mean more time in the epistles, which I personally would love to have. My church seems a bit cold at times and I think that a lot of that stems from the fact that we've been in Genesis, Romans, and now Exodus since I've been there (almost 5 years). Our pastor wants to preach Matthew next, but I hope he will think about covering an epistle first (if not, right after).

word verification: metas

sonofthunder7 said...

Somehow I missed this post back in the day. Just finished reading it. Good words.

Sir Aaron said...

Let's face it. God's people have never been very good on the issue of divorce. Jesus himself said so in the sermon on the mount.

And Newsweek's argument is an old one. It's regurgitated hash that they use on other issues such as slavery and war.

The standard on marriage and divorce is clear in the Bible. It's not written in parables or allegories. Newsweek and their ilk just choose to ignore it to sully the name of Christ and His followers.

So I'll grant you that the modern church have fallen short on decrying the number of divorces, but lets not pretend that Newsweek would write a different article if there were zero divorces in the church.

boyd said...

Actually Newsweek is using the same tactic that the Word of faith and celebrity super church robber barons use(ignoring new coveant principles). That being, talking more about the old testament tithe and the wealth of Abramham than the sacrifice of Jesus. The modern "get it now" church goer knows more about Abramham, Elijah, and the old testament prophets and the writings of Malachi than they do about the apostle Paul.

mencanbeabusedtoo said...

I'm wondering what you think of Luther writing in regards to the church and marriage...

"That it is a worldly issue and the church should have no part in it"

He was writing in regards to the Roman churches insistence that a priest had to preside at a marriage for it to be valid.. (the RC church ratified it in 1553) until then the church had no role in marrying people...

thomas4881 said...

I heard one Pastor say that Christians who get divorced shouldn't be second class citizens in the Church. He pointed out that Moses was divorced and married a black woman. He cautioned getting legalistic about the issue.

Stan McCullars said...

I would caution against being any more legalistic than Paul.

Frank Turk said...

MenCan --

I would say that this is not the only thing Luther is wrong about. cf. lutheranism.

I think your view of the history of marriage is less than fully informed. For example, certainly the Council of Trent did affirm that marriage ought to be a poublic ceremony, but it did so in 1563, not 1553 -- and that, against a contemporary trend in the 16th century to make weddings private affairs of neither political nor religious concern. While Luther may have had his own views, these were soundly and roundly rejected by almost all other reformers who take their cues for Paul, especially the letter to the Ephesians. The trend for private marriages died out -- and it was an anomaly in the history of the West.

As early as 866 is is plain that the public, religious nature of marriage was being practiced in the West, and we can trace it back even to the first century after Christ in the apologetic arguments of the first defenders of the Christian faith -- that the Christian view of marriage is first spiritual, but that spiritual blessing has material, ethical consequences.

stratagem said...

Agree. I would say that the mere statement "what God has put together, let no man put asunder" alone makes it a religious matter, no matter what Luther or anyone else says/said to the contrary.

Sir Aaron said...

Ok, somebody needs to address the Luther quote head on.

Luther,like all men, had concerns of the day to deal with too. And like other great men he was a sinner and made mistakes. You'll find that he did a couple of things which it appears he later regretted. The bigamy of Philip being one of them. On the whole, you'll find that Luther said many times that one man and one woman was the standard for Christian marriage. Likewise, he held rigidly to the gospels and Christ's only reason for divorce: Adultery. (which was one of the reasons he made the aforementioned mistake).

Accordingly, you may say to the carnal people (with whom you have to do), if they want to be Christians, they must keep married fidelity and bridle their flesh, not give it license. If they want to be heathen, let them do what they please, at their own risk.