14 September 2011

Because people keep asking about this:

by Phil Johnson



    didn't have a major problem with CBD selling copies of the Koran. Christians need to know what's in it. If we're going to respond to Islam, we must to deal with the Koran from a position of knowledge, not ignorance.

I bought my copies (one English and another interlinear) from Barnes and Noble years ago. I would rather have given the profit to a Christian company.

Presumably, it's all a moot point now, because CBD have apparently pulled the Koran from their catalogue rather than face an outpouring of wrath from the mavens of online discernment.

Well, OK. I can understand why some might see the Koran in their catalogue and raise an eyebrow, but a moment's thought (or a simple e-mail query to CBD before blogging about it) might have eased everyone's concerns. If CBD had an agenda to erase the distinction between Christianity and Islam—or even if they had gone soft on universalism—I'd be up in arms. But I really don't think that's what was behind this little controversy.

Phil's signature

21 comments:

Ken Silva said...

That's the way I see it as well.

Sarah said...

I would much rather see the Koran in the CBD catalogue than much of the so-called "Christian" books. At least you know what you're getting with the Koran.

Raising Godly Children said...

If you want a Quran just go to a Mosque. They hand them out like Halloween Candy : - )

Edward said...

Well I am not so naive that I think they just sell it for Christian to be familiar with the koran. I am sure they sell it to muslims as well. You don't have to buy it to read it, it's all over the internet. A company can't have a personal relationship with Christ so I would not call any company a Christian company. They are in business to make a buck unless they are nonprofit and then they have to make money to pay expenses.

Peter Eddy said...

It's interesting reading this, Phil, after not so long ago Logos announced it was going to sell Romanist stuff.

Is the difference here that Logos is trying "to erase the distinction between Christianity" and Rome, where CBD (with respect to Islam) isn't?

Tim said...

I really enjoyed this article because I learned a new word! I don't think I've ever heard "maven" before. Thanks :)

ABrokenReed said...

why don't you just read it online? that's what i would do.

Glenn E. Chatfield said...

CBD long ago left behind any pretense of being a "Christian" book store. IT is no better than Barnes and Noble for all the aberrational and heretical teaching it sells. So what's the big deal about selling the Qur'an? Just more false teachings.

Timothy said...

I plan on getting a Koran eventually, but my goal is to purchase one at a thrift store or used book store, if possible. I would feel better about doing this, since my money would not financially support a Muslim company, or help fund Islam . That being said, I believe this is an issue of conscience, and I essentially agree with Phil and Ken. We need to know the truth claims of Muslims from primary sources, and I personally would not purchase a new one published by a Muslim company, but I wouldn't be up in arms about a bookstore selling it (it is a book, after all) or a Christian buying it. Sarah makes a good point as well... I have a much bigger problem with the fluff and heresy pandered to the undiscerning. Lastly, I wonder: Are there any Christian publishing companies that offer the Koran?

Arthur Sido said...

Selling the Koran is no worse than CBD selling the "Patriots Bible" with an ad comparing the Founding Fathers with Jesus and the Apostles.

http://thesidos.blogspot.com/2011/09/this-is-too-much.html

Robert Warren said...

@Timothy:
Kind of related to a recent kerfuffle, Logos Bible Software currently sells various editions of the Koran (Qur'an; [Reverend Fletcher, Feltcher, whatever]). But, if you act now (sorry, no ginsus), they have an Arabic classics collection (Perseus Collection) which includes English and Arabic editions of the Koran, for free.

@Tim:
Quoth the mavens ;)

afisherofmen said...

I was curious of why they did it, which is why I emailed them.

thepaperthinhymn.com said...

Fact: You cannot buy Rob Bell's book Love Wins on CBD. They had it for a while, with a note that said something like "because people wish to interact with primary sources we are making this book available, but all profits from it will be donated to so-and-so ministry" I thought that was cool. Now its not even there at all. Atta be!

ajlin said...

Maybe they were just hoping to cash in on 'zeal without knowledge' preachers who would want to buy the Koran to burn it.

Rhology said...

It's probably too much to ask that CBD carry Usama Dakdok's translation of "the Generous Qur'an", and that's a shame.

Jason Moore said...

I would agree Chrisitian should know how to answer to other religous text. Can anyone recommend a copy version I can grab on iBooks?

Coram Deo said...

The cleanest solution for this for-profit business venture is to simply drop the pretense and change its trade name to "Religious Book Distributors".

This is classic Plastic-Fishianity stuff, folks.

Mammon-Я-Us.

In Him,
CD

Peter Eddy said...

Coram,

The difficulty with your suggestion is that Christians like buying stuff from Christians, especially given that Christian publications sell orders of magnitude fewer than secular books do. Drop the Christian spin in the name and I suspect it will lose patronage.

Edward said...

I made one post and that is usually my limit but I had a thought. Why do we need to read the koran or any other religious holy book to debate anyone. All we need to know is does what they say square with the Word Of The Living God. Our problem is not knowing what the koran says but what does the Holy Bible say. People need to spend more time studying the Bible so they can teach the people in their sphere of influence. One verse at a time starting a home and going out from there living a life that backs up what they say.

Coram Deo said...

I didn't have a major problem with CBD selling copies of Hustler. Christians need to know what's in it. If we're going to respond to the purveyors of porn, we must deal with Hustler from a position of knowledge, not ignorance.

I bought my copies from Barnes and Noble years ago. I would rather have given the profit to a Christian company.

Presumably, it's all a moot point now, because CBD have apparently pulled Hustler from their catalogue rather than face an outpouring of wrath from the mavens of online discernment.

Well, OK. I can understand why some might see Hustler in their catalogue and raise an eyebrow, but a moment's thought (or a simple e-mail query to CBD before blogging about it) might have eased everyone's concerns. If CBD had an agenda to erase the distinction between Christianity and the porn industry — or even if they had gone soft on fornication in general — I'd be up in arms. But I really don't think that's what was behind this little controversy.


Replace the porn example with the subject of your choice. Homo-erotica, Rastafarianism, etc.

Pragmatic relativism, it's hours of fun for everyone!

In Christ,
CD

Pastor Pants said...

The two are completely different, CD.

The Koran, while being untrue, can be read by Christians seeking to understand and interact with the Islamic faith. It would not be sin per se.

The same could not be said for pornography. Obviously.

Apples and Oranges.